ST2Makefile

Since I wrote the STM32CubeMX to Makefile converter, a lot of people have been helping to improve the project. Thanks! Meanwhile I also heard a lot of complaints about the quality of STM32Cube codes, for example, the thread here. Although I believe STM32Cube’s quality will eventually improve, at the moment there are still applications for the good old “Standard Peripheral Library” and other ST middlewares. Therefore I wrote another program, that converts most of ST’s example project into Makefile project. Continue reading

Writing peripheral initialization code is probably the most tedious work in embedded development. It always successfully stops me from starting a new project. I believe engineers at STMicroelectronics share the same pain. Therefore they created STM32Cube firmware and STM32CubeMX graphical configuration tool, which turns numerous key strokes and page flips into just a few mouse clicks. STM32CubeMX is free software, but the initialization code it generates require compiler tools carrying hefty price tags, IARARM, Keil ARM-MDK, and Atollic TrueSTUDIO, to name the few. Fair enough these compilers do offer free editions with limited functionality. But I still prefer unrestricted, free tool that is easily scale-able for my current and future projects. Just like the GNU Make and ARM GCC toolchain I described in Opensource STM32 development.

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STM32 half-duplex SPI connection

I’ve got my hands onto some STM32F030F4P6 ARM-Cortex M0 processors. Though touted as “32 cents 32-bit micro”, it is not that inexpensive from DigiKey in one-off quantity ($1.45). However it is still cheaper than ATmegas and offers 3 times the performance. The chip comes in 20-pin TSSOP package. Limited pins require much more thoughts when assigning pin function. For example, using 3-pin half-duplex SPI instead of 4-pin full-duplex SPI saves me 1 very precious GPIO pin. Continue reading

HX8352C emWin development board

One lucky day you wake up to find your dream of creating sophisticated graphics user interface for MCU projects comes true, because STMicroelectronics has released a free version of SEGGER emWin for STM32 line of ARM controllers. But your excitement is quickly balanced by the frustration that your favourite LCD panel is not supported. That is a typical day of mine, and my favourite LCD is a 2.6″ 400×240 IPS panel, model TFT1P5971-E by Truly. This post is about how to make the LCD usable with emWin. Continue reading

Eclipse project folder

In an upcoming project I need a micro controller that operates: 1x 16-bit DAC (SPI); 1x 24-bit ADC (SPI); 1x 8-bit parallel LCD; 1x rotary encoder; 1x PWM fan; 1x fan tachometer; 1x temperature sensor (DS18B20); 2x analog switches; 1x uplink UART; 4x push buttons, and some voltage monitoring for various power rails. To my estimation these peripherals require about 40 pins. Considering the additional clock, power and programming/debug lines, the minimal pin count I’m going for is 64. So I went to element 14 parametric search to look for a suitable chip.

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